Skip to main content

Table 1 Characteristics of RCTs

From: A meta-analysis for the effect of prophylactic GTN on the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis and on the successful rate of cannulation of bile ducts

First auther Year Location Sample size Intervention(treatment/control) Related outcomes Allocation
concealment
Sudhindran S 2001 UK 186 2 mg sublingual GTN 90/96 Control A and B ADEQUAT
Wehrmann T 2001 Germany 80 10 mg topical GTN 40/40 Control A and B NOT CLEAR
Ghori A 2002 UK 254 0.4-0.8 mg sublingualGTN128/126 Control B ADEQUATE
Moretó M 2003 Spain 144 15 mg transdermal GTN 71/73 Control A and B ADEQUATE
Talwar A 2005 UK 104 5 mg topical GTN52/52 Control B NOT CLEAR
Kaffes AJ 2006 Australia 318 5 mg transdermal GTN 155/163 Control A and B NOT CLEAR
Beauchant M 2008 France 208 < mg intravenous GTN 105/103 Control A and B NOT CLEAR
Nøjgaard C 2009 Norway 806 15 mg transdermal GTN 401/405 Control A and B ADEQUATE
Hao JY 2009 China 74 5 mg sublingual GTN 38/36 Control A NOT CLEAR
A: the outcome of PEP B:the outcome of cannulation
The definition of the post-ERCP pancreatitis
Sudhindran S Acute pancreatitis was defined as a serum amylase level greater than 1000 (normal range 5-300) units/ml
at 6 h in association with a visual analogue pain score of more than 5.
Wehrmann T Pancreatitis, defined according to published recommendations by Cotton PB et al (1991).
Moretó M Pancreatitis, defined according to published recommendations by Cotton PB et al (1991).
Kaffes AJ Pancreatitis, defined according to published recommendations by Cotton PB et al (1991).
Beauchant M Pancreatitis, defined according to published recommendations by Cotton PB et al (1991).
Nøjgaard C Pancreatitis, defined according to published recommendations by Cotton PB et al (1991).
Hao JY Post-ERCP pancreatitis could be defined as a disease with sustained pancreatitis symptoms (such as abdominal pain) and high-amylase value over the normal value after ERCP.